News that £9 million of funding has been granted to allow Future Pathways to run for even longer has been welcomed.

The Scottish Government has announced that it will fund the project for a further two years until at least 2023.

Flora Henderson, Alliance Manager for Future Pathways, said: “This welcome announcement will allow for further continued support to survivors of historical child abuse in care, in Scotland.

“Future Pathways offers tailored support to survivors of abuse or neglect and helps them to lead full, healthy and independent lives. Although over 1,400 survivors have already registered with us, we know there are more people out there who have had similar experiences and who could really benefit from our help and support.

“I would like to highlight the dedication of the Future Pathways team, our partners and importantly, the people we work with – their valued support has contributed enormously to the project’s continued success.”

Mental Health Minister for Scotland Clare Haughey said: “The support provided by Future Pathways is vital to help people abused or neglected as children while in care to lead full, healthy and independent lives. “It’s one of a number of initiatives which the government is funding to support those abused while in care.”

Legislation to provide financial redress to people who were abused in care as children is set to be introduced in Scotland this year.

Deputy First Minister John Swinney has confirmed that the Redress (Survivors of In Care Abuse) (Scotland) Bill will be introduced in the Scottish Parliament following its summer recess.

He has set out his intentions in a letter to Education and Skills Convener Clare Adamson MSP, which has been published on the Scottish Parliament website.

Mr Swinney made a statement in Parliament in October 2018 giving a commitment to establishing a financial redress scheme for survivors of child abuse in care and ensuring that the legislation for it is passed before the end of the Parliamentary term in March 2021, subject to parliamentary approval.

A total of 280 people took part in a public consultation on the redress scheme at the end of 2019, and a report on the results was published in March this year.

For more information about the redress scheme, please go to the Scottish Government website.

How do you feel about life under lockdown? One of the people supported by Future Pathways shared his thoughts with us:

“I’m amazed at how little this pandemic has impacted my life. In the beginning, the very word “pandemic ” brought fear surging into my life but as time went on, I find no fear.

“Many around me are living in fear. 

“You can see it in their eyes. They move off of the pavements to avoid people.  Masks of fear on everyone’s faces. 

“Rubber gloves, hand sanitizer, wash, wash, washing of hands.

“Watching every sound byte, every news update. Feeding the fear with every word Boris Johnson utters.

“Hold on, this is my world of fear.

“I’m the one so used to living in perpetual fear.

“I avoid social contact. 

“I avoid people. 

“The world has become confusing. 

“It’s turned upside down overnight. 

“I’ve lived with anxiety, depression, panic attacks,  social phobia,  that fear of sudden death most of my life.

“Now the rest of the world is getting a taste of my day to day life. 

“My normal, wasn’t normal. 

“This life we are all living just now, doesn’t feel normal but strangely I fit in to it.

“Except, I don’t have their fears.

“I like that there are less people on the streets.

“I like that pubs are closed.

“I like that shops are not busy.

“Part of me wants it to stay like this.

“It’s quieter 

“I’m not on high alert. 

“I think of putting in more self-care during this time. 

“Working on all the issues that have pushed me down. 

“It seems like the perfect time. 

“Maybe others will be reflecting on their own life situation. 

“I wonder what good will come from all of this?”

More than 1,000 people had registered for support with Future Pathways by summer 2019, according to the latest quarterly report.

There was an average of 40 registrations a month, with an increase in the number signing up from out-with the central belt and the rest of the UK.

And all the registrations from the rest of the world came exclusively from people who are now living in Australia.

The number of older adults registering increased due to the launch of the Scottish Government’s Advance Payment Scheme for those aged over 70 or who have a terminal illness.

The report, which covers April to June this year, also contains a financial breakdown of what was spent by Future Pathways.

You can read the report by clicking here.